Back to All Events

Save The Olympic Peninsula (STOP)

 A Marbled Murrelet on the wing. This robin-sized seabird can fly up to 103 m.p.h but may not be able to escape the impacts of the U.S. Navy's proposed Northwest Training and Testing program planned for the Olympic Peninsula.

A Marbled Murrelet on the wing. This robin-sized seabird can fly up to 103 m.p.h but may not be able to escape the impacts of the U.S. Navy's proposed Northwest Training and Testing program planned for the Olympic Peninsula.

Learn how the future of the Olympic Peninsula is tied to the fate of the Marbled Murrelet. The Save the Olympic Peninsula is a non-profit organization spearheading a campaign to responsibly address the impacts of the U.S. Navy's proposed Electronic Warfare Range on the Olympic Peninsula. The Navy estimates the loss of 112 Marbled Murrelets over the next 20 years from the impact of "Growler" jet flights and other military exercises. Why should we care about 112 small, secretive seabirds that nest in the mature coastal forests of the Olympic Peninsula? Why does protecting the endangered Marbled Murrelet ultimately help protect humans, other wildlife, and the wilderness soundscape?

Maria will be introducing the audience to this fascinating seabird--its unusual life history, the tale of the 185-long search for its nest, why saving it matters, and where you can go to see them in your neighborhood. Q&A and sales and signing of Rare Bird will follow presentation. 

Monday, May 15
6:30 to 8:30 p.m.
Port Angeles Library
2210 S. Peabody St., Port Angeles

 A U.S. Navy "Growler" aircraft, capable of exposing ears of all species to sound levels of 160 decibels. Human hearing loss can occur with repeated exposure to sounds over 85 decibels

A U.S. Navy "Growler" aircraft, capable of exposing ears of all species to sound levels of 160 decibels. Human hearing loss can occur with repeated exposure to sounds over 85 decibels