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I fell in love with clouds the same way I fell in love with marbled murrelets: madly and unexpectedly. After living in sunny Southern California from 2001 to 2006, I moved my family to the Pacific Northwest. There were many reasons for the move—the weather was one of them. I missed the seasons, the watery landscape, the drama of the skies, the clouds. 

After living under the clouds for seven months out of the year (some say nine), I had a very strange experience of a cloud while standing in a friend’s front hall one October morning in 2008. That experience—a spark, a snag, and the micro-epiphany that I knew little to nothing about clouds. And the only way I was going to fix that was to write a book about them. I did not expect it took take eight years but clouds are complex and they keep changing.

 I finished my manuscript in the fall of 2016. A Sideways Look at Clouds, which will be published in September 30 by  the wonderful Mountaineers Books in Seattle. You can pre-order a copy here.

While you wait, here is a chapter that explains what happened with the cloud in the hall.

And here (below) are photographs of some of the clouds that dazzled, distracted, and inspired me to write my book:

 

And here is a word cloud of the mostly commonly used words in seven different definitions of the word "cloud" from my dictionaries, meteorology books, and weather websites. 

And here is a word cloud of the mostly commonly used words in seven different definitions of the word "cloud" from my dictionaries, meteorology books, and weather websites.