Author photo by Michael Ruth 2017

Author photo by Michael Ruth 2017

Maria Mudd Ruth is the author of more than a dozen books on natural history topics for the young readers, general audiences, and accidental naturalists like herself. 

My latest book, A Sideways Look at Clouds, was published September 2017 by Mountaineers Books. This work of narrative non fiction blends science, wonder, humor to take readers on the scenic route through the clouds. You can order copies here. If you'd like a signed or inscribed copy (plus modest shipping fee), please contact Browsers Bookshop (a fabulous indie bookstore). Check out the Events page to find a book event/author reading near you. 

Maria's other published books include Rare Bird: Pursuing the Mystery of the Marbled Murrelet (Rodale Press 2006,  Mountaineers Books reissue, 2013 ) for the general (adult) reader. Titles for young adults and children include The Ultimate Ocean Book, The Butterfly, The Beetle (3-D portfolios); Hawks and Owls, Snakes, The Pacific Coast, The Tundra, The Southwest Deserts, The Mississippi River,  and other titles.

My range of subjects reflects my “attention surplus disorder” and interest in restoring our awe in the natural world.  I am a member of the Black Hills Audubon Society Conservation Committee,  an active advocate for marbled murrelet conservation, a volunteer pigeon guillemot surveyor, a supporter of Olympia city parks,  a United Way reading buddy, along with other involvements.

Since Rare Bird was reissued in 2013, I've given dozens of presentations on the marbled murrelet, conservation issues, and natural-history writing to audiences at public libraries, schools, bookstores, conservation organizations. Please see the Events page for current and past events.  Please contact me  to schedule presentation and/or book signing.

I live under clouds 228 days a year in Olympia, Washington with my husband--mapmaker, Geographic Information Systems (GIS) professor, and enthusiast Mike Ruth.

 

Remember the "totality" zone during the August 2017 eclipse? Well, we are living in the totality zone for clouds--especially in the Pacific Northwest where spectacles like this happen nearly every day. And we can observe and enjoy them without funny glasses, long drives, or high-priced postage stamp "campsites" for viewing. Just look up!

Remember the "totality" zone during the August 2017 eclipse? Well, we are living in the totality zone for clouds--especially in the Pacific Northwest where spectacles like this happen nearly every day. And we can observe and enjoy them without funny glasses, long drives, or high-priced postage stamp "campsites" for viewing. Just look up!